2015-08-21

Blue Like Jazz: Nonreligious Thoughts on Christian Spirituality



http://amzn.to/1Eb00oc: $1.99 right now

TESTIMONY: This book completely revolutionized my view of God and of a life of faith. This is the key that shook me loose from the spirit of religion that I'd grown up with. LOVE this book! -- NWP

“I never liked jazz music because jazz music doesn’t resolve. I used to not like God because God didn’t resolve. But that was before any of this happened.” -- Donald Miller

In Donald Miller’s early years, he was vaguely familiar with a distant God. But when he came to know Jesus Christ, he pursued the Christian life with great zeal. Within a few years he had a successful ministry that ultimately left him feeling empty, burned out, and, once again, far away from God. In this intimate, soul-searching account, Miller describes his remarkable journey back to a culturally relevant, infinitely loving God.

For anyone wondering if the Christian faith is still relevant in a postmodern culture.

For anyone thirsting for a genuine encounter with a God who is real.

For anyone yearning for a renewed sense of passion in their life.

Blue Like Jazz is a fresh and original perspective on life, love, and redemption.


Miller (Prayer and the Art of Volkswagen Maintenance) is a young writer, speaker and campus ministry leader. An earnest evangelical who nearly lost his faith, he went on a spiritual journey, found some progressive politics and most importantly, discovered Jesus’ relevance for everyday life. 

This book, in its own elliptical way, tells the tale of that journey. But the narrative is episodic rather than linear, Miller’s style evocative rather than rational and his analysis personally revealing rather than profoundly insightful. As such, it offers a postmodern riff on the classic evangelical presentation of the Gospel.

Written as a series of short essays on vaguely theological topics (faith, grace, belief, confession, church). Often Miller is enjoyably clever, and his story is telling and beautiful, even poignant. (The story of the reverse confession booth is worth the price of the book.)

The title is meant to be evocative, and the subtitle –”Non-Religious” thoughts about “Christian Spirituality” – indicates Miller’s distrust of the institutional church and his desire to appeal to those experimenting with other flavors of spirituality.


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